Friday, February 7, 2020

Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian - Essay Example The novel can be called a â€Å"historical novel† without the aura of historical fiction, and not an â€Å"escapist Western† as it chronicles the expeditions of Glanton’s paramilitary gang sent out by both the Mexican and Texan authorities to murder and scalp as many Apaches as possible. Further encouraged by the bounty offered by a Mexican governor for Indian scalps, the Glanton gang takes to scalp hunting Apaches with a vengeance. However, this is not just a case of bloodthirsty whites slaughtering noble savages: the Apaches themselves commit horrendous atrocities of their own. Most of the action in the novel centers around Judge Holden, a massive 7-foot albino who towers over everyone else, yet seems pre-pubescent because of his total lack of hair and small hands and feet. (â€Å"He was bald as a stone and had no trace of beard and had no brows to his eyes nor lashes to them† {McCarthy 6}). Judge Holden manages to manipulate everyone with whom he comes into contact (even Glanton), and easily turns situations to his advantage. The Judge’s physical characteristics are used as comparison with other characters such as the Kid (the Kid is not big, but he has big wrists and hands {McCarthy 4} – unlike the Judge’s small hands) and the dead babies that the Kid finds, who â€Å"stare eyeless at the naked sky. Bald and pale and bloated†¦Ã¢â‚¬  (McCarthy 57): a comparison with the Judge, who is bald and pale (being an albino). Judge Holden is a mystery from his very first appearance in the novel and remains so until the very end, when he is one of the few characters surviving. One mysterious aspect is his uncanny ability to move from place to place so swiftly and eerily that it seems he is in fact not one, but two persons (e.g. he escapes from the riot in Reverend Green’s tent to a salon where he is completely dry, even though it is heavily raining outside). His seeming â€Å"double

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

A Movement Away From Colloquial Singapore English :: Singapore Language Papers

A Movement Away From Colloquial Singapore English ‘The need for intelligibility and the need for identity often pull people – and countries – in opposing directions. The former motivates the learning of an international language, with English as the first choice in most cases; the latter motivates the promotion of ethnic language and culture’ (David Crystal, 1997). Language planning policies in Singapore have often been characterised by the ‘desire to achieve a balance between the national pride of linguistic ownership and the need for international intelligibility’ (Khoo 1993: 67). This is evident, for instance, in the state’s current move to promote the use of Standard English (particularly the variety known as Standard Singaporean English, or SSE) and to discourage that variety known as Colloquial Singapore English (CSE, or Singlish as it is popularly known), although in this case, the state’s ‘desire to achieve a balance’ between intelligibility and identity appears to be one involving conflict rather than compromise – one in which these two principles (embodied by SSE and CSE respectively) appear to be opposing linguistic forces, and in which the former appears to be espoused and the latter (at least in the case of CSE, though not that of the ethnic ‘mother tongues’) denigrated. T his essay will study whether (and if so, why) these two principles are truly opposed to each other, as seemingly implied by both the David Crystal quotation and the English language policy in Singapore, and in what way the application of these principles may result (as stated in the Crystal quotation) in the ‘pulling apart’ of people and countries, especially in the sense of socio-economic inequality and marginalisation on both international and intra-national levels; and all these will in turn be related to the present-day situation in Singapore. At first sight, the need for identity and intelligibility appear to be irreconcilable on a linguistic level, the former requiring the adherence to a dominant language variety (such as Standard English) as well as its set of linguistic norms in order for speakers to maintain mutual comprehension, and thus implicitly demanding the non-usage or even abandonment of alternate varieties (Leith and Graddol, 1996: 139); the latter demanding, by contrast, the use of languages or varieties apart from this dominant variety as a way of identifying with one’s culture and distinguishing it from the rest (Crystal 1997: 133–134) – languages and varieties that are, however, incomprehensible to a large proportion of the world population and will therefore (as some perceive: e. A Movement Away From Colloquial Singapore English :: Singapore Language Papers A Movement Away From Colloquial Singapore English ‘The need for intelligibility and the need for identity often pull people – and countries – in opposing directions. The former motivates the learning of an international language, with English as the first choice in most cases; the latter motivates the promotion of ethnic language and culture’ (David Crystal, 1997). Language planning policies in Singapore have often been characterised by the ‘desire to achieve a balance between the national pride of linguistic ownership and the need for international intelligibility’ (Khoo 1993: 67). This is evident, for instance, in the state’s current move to promote the use of Standard English (particularly the variety known as Standard Singaporean English, or SSE) and to discourage that variety known as Colloquial Singapore English (CSE, or Singlish as it is popularly known), although in this case, the state’s ‘desire to achieve a balance’ between intelligibility and identity appears to be one involving conflict rather than compromise – one in which these two principles (embodied by SSE and CSE respectively) appear to be opposing linguistic forces, and in which the former appears to be espoused and the latter (at least in the case of CSE, though not that of the ethnic ‘mother tongues’) denigrated. T his essay will study whether (and if so, why) these two principles are truly opposed to each other, as seemingly implied by both the David Crystal quotation and the English language policy in Singapore, and in what way the application of these principles may result (as stated in the Crystal quotation) in the ‘pulling apart’ of people and countries, especially in the sense of socio-economic inequality and marginalisation on both international and intra-national levels; and all these will in turn be related to the present-day situation in Singapore. At first sight, the need for identity and intelligibility appear to be irreconcilable on a linguistic level, the former requiring the adherence to a dominant language variety (such as Standard English) as well as its set of linguistic norms in order for speakers to maintain mutual comprehension, and thus implicitly demanding the non-usage or even abandonment of alternate varieties (Leith and Graddol, 1996: 139); the latter demanding, by contrast, the use of languages or varieties apart from this dominant variety as a way of identifying with one’s culture and distinguishing it from the rest (Crystal 1997: 133–134) – languages and varieties that are, however, incomprehensible to a large proportion of the world population and will therefore (as some perceive: e.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Personal practice related to ANA scope of practice Essay

As a nurse, one must follow a scope of practice, what is expected of them within their role of the nursing profession. These guidelines shape the responsibility of the professional nursing organization and serve to protect the public. According to, Nursing’s Social Policy Statement: The Essence of the Profession (American Nurses Association, 2010, p. ) defines contemporary nursing: â€Å"Nursing is the protection, promotion, and optimization of health and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, alleviation of suffering through the diagnosis and treatment of human response, and advocacy in the care of individuals, families, communities, and populations. † I believe my role, as a nurse is consistent with the scope of practice outlined by ANA and the contemporary definition cited. As a nurse, I strive to be clinically competent and aware of the constant challenges that one faces on a daily basis. Being well informed promotes health and prevents further illness and injuries. One goal I try to set aside every week is to attend a weekly ground rounds meeting, where additional education is provided on a specific case study. This opportunity allows me to stay current and up to date on new medications available, research findings and team collaboration feedback from staff on effective treatment options for optimal patient outcome. In addition, completing required competencies and being a member of Oncology Nursing Society also strengthens my knowledge and skill in providing the best evidence based practice to an individual and their families. Being a resource nurse for my unit allows me the opportunity to share my knowledge with the staff and actively participate in mentoring young nurses build a strong foundation and develop critical thinking skills. Education is critical in the nursing profession. Lifelong learning must be an ongoing process due to the rapidly growing population and technology advancements in our society today. I believe it is the responsibility of the nurse to facilitate this process and collaborate with other nurses in their field to continue to work together to strengthen the role of the nurse in an environment that requires continuous education and competencies. â€Å"Registered nurses must continually reassess their competencies and identify needs for additional knowledge, skills, personal growth, and integrative learning experiences† (American Nurses Association, 2010 p. 13). State legal regulations and professional standards of nursing The Ohio Board of Nursing defines nursing and the scope of nursing practice. Rules and regulations are in place to determine compliance set in motion by the Nurse Practice Act. Responsibility is outlined by establishing standards for nursing education programs, eligibility to sit for the state licensure exam, renewal criteria of that license, and setting standards for continuing education to meet renewal criteria. The Board is also responsible for defining the standards of delivering safe nursing care for registered nurses and protecting the community with these standards. Another role the Board is responsible for is reviewing and investigating violations of this Nurse Practice Act and determining if a nurses license is to be denied, revoked, suspended, or restricted in any way (Ohio Nurses Association). It is essential that nurses maintain an understanding of the legal regulations within their nursing practice. The Ohio Board of Nursing requires all Ohio nurses to have continuing education on Ohio law with a total of 24 continuing education hours every two years for license renewal (Ohio Board of Nursing). As a professional, I feel it is my primary responsibility to understand the law and regulations defined before me, this knowledge allows me to safely practice nursing care and deliver the best care to my community. I have worked in other states as well, and of those states I have worked, Ohio is the only one requiring a continuing education credit with a focus on state law and regulations. I feel every state should have continuing education credit requirements for renewal and at least one of the required credits have a focus on law. It is important as a professional to have knowledge of this. To have a check and balance system in place to make sure one is justly maintaining these standards and expectations in delivering a safe competent nurse to our community is vital to the population as a whole. Provisions 7, 8 and 9 â€Å"Provision 8 describes the nurse’s moral obligation to society. Provision 9 describes the responsibilities of the nursing profession to both the individual nurse and society in general. Provision 7 provides the necessary linkage between individual competence and evolving professional standards of practice, in addition to giving nurses a responsive and collaborative role n health policy for the overall advancement of the profession† (Fowler & Association, 2010, p. 91). Initially, these Provisions were never intended to be carved out of stone, but historically, they have been a guide and continue to be a guiding force of moral and ethical standards to follow. I pride myself on working for a hospital that fosters an environment on ethical integrity and professionalism. Because of this strong thread, it motivates me to do more, achieve more, and be more than I am today. I want my patients and my community to feel that they are receiving the best nursing care. An example I recently explored was implementing a grid to follow based on patient’s diagnosis and treatment pathway prior to admission to the floor. I work in the hospital’s rapid admissions unit. My goal is to have the patient to their room in 30 minutes or less. Of recent, we have received a lot of admissions for pancreatitis, however, I have noticed that the patient arrives to my unit without pain management options, i. e. PCA pump. This has delayed the patient’s comfort and care prior to arrival to HRAU leaving me scrambling to get pain orders, equipment and recover any customer service issues. This grid allows a framework to use as a guide of anticipated orders and outcomes. I presented this grid to my nursing manager, our staff and the ER manager and charge nurses for their collaborative input and suggestions. So far it has been effective, and we are working on additional areas to cover as well. Nursing is continually evolving and as a professional it is our job to facilitate education within our community of nurses so we can better serve our patient population. Philosophical forces influencing practice Philosophy is an attitude toward life and that attitude evolves from every nurses belief system. One’s attitudes are shaped by their environment and an accumulation of life experiences, I define nursing as a way to give back. Giving good nursing care doesn’t stop at being knowledgeable about medicine and having the very best in technology. It goes beyond, by reaching that individual on a spiritual level and connecting with them. I have always believed that one cannot be taught how to show compassion, an individual either possesses that ability or they do not. I have always believed that that is one of my strongest qualities, and this has been reconfirmed back to me by my patients through the years. To truly interact with a person you need to gain their trust, once that has been achieved through a therapeutic environment, healing is then possible. Ethical principles influencing practice There are standards in place to dictate the need to protect patient’s values, beliefs, culture and safety. It is difficult at times, when dealing with challenging patients and having to handle the stress of our jobs to remain open and unbiased. It is nice to have a reminder that our patient’s values come first and respect their choices. Our role is to educate them about their treatment plan and make sure they are well informed, while letting go of our own attitudes. Determining, nursing practice are essential for dealing with day-to-day ethical issues (Jormsri, Kunaviktikul, Ketefian & Chaowalit, 2005). I recently had an Asian woman who presented with abdominal pain and requested to have cupping performed by a healer specialized in the field. I was initially at a loss, how was I going to find someone to perform cupping. I wanted to help this woman and when I asked my colleagues and manager they had no suggestions. So I contacted the department that handles cultural awareness and was able to get a lead on whom to call. After, two hours of my day spent looking for someone to call, I finally had my answer. I came back to give my patient an update on the progress and she was so relieved. It was like you could see the anxiety drain out of her. By the end of the day, the therapist arrived to do cupping with her and she was relaxed and expressed that she truly felt like I heard her. It was not easy and I did find myself getting frustrated with the process of trying to make something work that I knew very little about. I’m happy I followed through with it, because in the end every patient has a right to believe what they believe, even though her values and attitude toward medicine is very different than my own, I was able to put aside my own views and attitude and really help someone else. Conclusion Many might say nursing is a science and some might say nursing is an art. I believe it is both. To be a successful nurse one must have the passion to continue their education and apply their knowledge through the science of nursing, and have the efficacy and compassion to provide the art of caring. Without caring the nurse is unable to connect with the patient and if the nurse cannot connect, trust will not develop between the nurse and the patient. I have always believed nursing is a calling and it is one of the most challenging jobs to have, but by far it has been the most rewarding.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Essay on Purpose Driven Church Book Review - 1226 Words

Rick Warren in his book the purpose driven church was mandated to attempt to put in print the story of Saddleback church. From shear curiosity be both Jew and gentile most religious and business leaders had at least a cursory interest in how a church grew to 10,000 attendees. Call it divine intervention, a killer marketing plan, being at the right place at the right time, blind luck or a combination of them all. Spending 25 years in corporate America I view Rick Warrens approach to growing a church (or anything for that matter) as spot on. His due diligence (neighborhood survey) growth assumptions and overhead (17-19 locations) product (The Gospel) delivery and the, vision, purpose and organizational structure have delivered noticeable†¦show more content†¦Love is the last thing most would think of in today’s modern church. However Pastor Warren is quick to point out that â€Å"today the church is not facing a radically different world mindset but rather a challe nge in communication, speak to the unbeliever in terms they can understand and relate to†. Who: Matt 10:5-6 the who†¦.Jews and not Samaritans, or gentiles What: A church for the un-churched. â€Å"If the church is not affecting the world, it is not being effective, affecting the world starts in your community†. How: focus â€Å"They want to hear something on Sunday that they can apply on Monday† Saturday and Sunday messages to the seeker, have great music and child care Can one church possibly meet the needs of every type of person? Matt 10:5-6 Just as Corinthians describes the church as a body with many members creating the whole based on individual gifts. Churches are members of Christ body reaching out to a diverse creation. Sinner†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦.All Gender†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Male and Female Ethnicity†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦..White, African American, Hispanic, Asian Vocation†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦White collar, Blue collar Education†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦High School, College, Graduate school Income†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦25K-$2.5m â€Å"He caught fish on their terms† preach about things that people can apply to their lives. Make the gospel come alive and demonstrate that it is as relevantShow MoreRelatedEverlasting Changes During the Enlightenment1512 Words   |  6 Pagesthroughout the world, motivated by improving intellect and the human society. Scholars congregated at coffeehouses to debate and further their learning in a far less formal many than institutions. Enlightenment thinkers were a unique group intolerant of church and state and sought out to establish an improved way of life. Reason based science and religion were major controversial components of the Enlightenment. These two topics were discussed and debated constantly as conflicting ideologies and beliefsRead More Ludwig Van Beethoven Essay1285 Words   |  6 Pagesin Vienna, Austria. His first teacher was his alcoholic father, who worked as a musician at the Court of Bonn. Teaching him day and night, Ludwig suffered from his fathers harsh and erratic behavior. For a time, he and his father played at the Church. As his fathers alcoholism increased, Ludwig became the main musician. Beethovens talents were discovered at an early age, and he was sent to Vienna to study under different teachers including Mozart and Hayden. There, Beethoven quickly adoptedRead MoreEnergy Drink Marketing : Marketing And Consumption Of Energy Drinks1140 Words   |  5 Pagesthe past ten years or so, there has been a growth in the uptake of the drinks and of the social media as whole. The convergence of the efforts to market the drinks and the growth of social media as a marketing tool. Using V as a case study, the review analyses the consumption of caffeinated beverages and the campaign that the manufacturer conducts in urging people to energize through Twitter as a social media platform of choice. The Twitter handle under scrutiny is the V Australia, @venergydrink123Read MoreThe Dissemination Of The Gospel1789 Words   |  8 Pagesothers believe that the proper approach of sharing the Gospel is through door-to-door soul winning and through preaching and teaching in the church. On e person’s approach to the Gospel that has been widely debated is that of Anne Marbury Hutchinson. Anne was born to a clergyman influenced by the Puritan leaders. Francis Marbury, Anne’s father, disagreed with the church of England and got into trouble with the Anglican leaders on separate occasions. Her father taught Anne the Bible, as a result she receivedRead MoreMy Museum Of World Religions Essay1575 Words   |  7 Pageshell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God the Father almighty; from there he will come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy Catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting. Amen Palestine The Apostles Creed is a good summary of Christian doctrine Christianity is based on the life and teachings of Jesus ChristRead MoreHungry for Worship Book Review Essay4525 Words   |  19 PagesLIBERTY UNIVERSITY HUNGRY FOR WORSHIP BY BOOK REVIEW SUBMITTED TO DR. RODNEY WHALEY IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE COMPLETION OF THE COURSE MUSC 610 – TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR WORSHIP BY KIANAN SMITH LYNCHBURG, VA JUNE 2014 Name: Kianan Smith Book Report # Spring 2014 Semester Hungry for Worship by: Frank S. Page and L. Lavon Gray Chapter 1: Summary: In this text, Hungry for Worship, authors Frank Page and L. Gray write aboutRead MoreEssay on Film Review of Lord of the Rings1246 Words   |  5 PagesFilm Review of Lord of the Rings In the film the â€Å"Lord Of The Rings†, there is a great evil called Sauron. The whole film is based on the theme of good Vs evil. The opening scene is about these rings being forged and given too different types of people like, elves, dwarfs andRead MoreIntroduction And Theoretical Explanation Of The Management Principle1407 Words   |  6 Pagesframework for employees to perform respective task. The organisation structure thereby forms a representative pyramid – narrow at the top and broad at the bottom (Book Reviews Comptes rendus, 1989). This concept of organised people management or man-management is traceable to the early days of Government, military, and the Roman Catholic Church (Murugan, 2004). Within each organisation a foundation hierarchy was created, thus implementing positions of authority, functional specialisation, operationalRead MoreThe Other Boleyn Girl1698 Words   |  7 PagesOther Boleyn Girlâ€Å" is a historical drama based on the novel of Philippa Gregory and tells the tale of romance, intrigues and betrayal of a defining moment in English history. It is set in the 16th century when the two sisters, Anne and Mary Boleyn are driven by their father and uncle to advance the family’s power and status. They are expected to divert the King of England who, immediately goes for the younger daughter, Mary. She gives birth to a son, which pleases the King, as the Queen, Catherine ofRead MoreDifferent Types Of Nonprofit Organizations1733 Words   |  7 Pagescommon and recognizable, there are several other types of nonprofit organization as outlined by the United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The IRS website, irs.gov, provides detailed information on all types of nonprofit organizations, their purposes and the filing requirement of each. Some of the other types of nonprofit organizations are organized under section 501(c)(6) business or trade associations; section 501(c)(7) which include social clubs and the like and 501(c)(8) and 501(c)(10) which

Friday, December 27, 2019

The Impact Of The Salem Witch Trials - 2018 Words

The Salem Witch Hunt Introduction The Salem Witch Trials is a term that is used to refer to a series of different witchcraft cases that were taken to the local magistrates of a region known as Salem that happened to be considered as a part of the Massachusetts Bay colony in the 17th Century (Roach and Rosenthal 925). Additionally, it is important to note that the Salem Witch Trials have been considered to be amongst some of the darkest periods in the American trial history. The reason why the trails were considered to be amongst the worst trials in the American history is brought out by the fact that over two hundred individuals were taken to court and collectively accused as witches (Baker 34). The end of the trials saw a total of†¦show more content†¦It is important to note that in the 17th century, people from Massachusetts were exposed to a kind of fear that was linked to the Devil and being constantly portrayed as always finding for all possible ways to infiltrate and interfere with Christianity in the American society (Clark and Aronson 401). In connection to this, it is important to understand that the Salem community was one of the strongly religious communities living that lived in near isolation and to some extent, in its own New World where the sense of fearing the devil had been made a part of the society. The fear that the community living in this area had was triggered when Tituba, one of the accused witches went on to confess that she was working for the devil (Martin and Bascle 70). The confession that was made led to the development of hysteria and panic in the region making the region to devote their efforts to a massive witch hunt. In this, it is important to note that despite there being some contributing factors in the witch hunt, the confession that was made by Tituba is always considered to be the main reason why the Salem Witch Trial came to being. During the trial period, the Massachusetts Bay colonists had initially engaged in the process of convicting individ uals for engaging in witchcraft for some time with one of the conviction that he made is that of Margaret Jones, that took place in 1648Show MoreRelatedThe Impact Of The Salem Witch Trials1263 Words   |  6 PagesThe myths surrounding the Salem Witch Trials of 1692 spike the interest of historians and non-academics alike. These trials have been the concern of different historical articles, novels, plays, films, and even religious debates. One issue that is certain, is the hysteria of the community overwhelmed Salem, Massachusetts in 1692 and 1693. A particular primary source, â€Å"Accounts of the Salem Witchcraft Trials (1693)† by Cotton Mather, suggests that the actions brought forth provided proof of satanicRead MoreThe Salem Witch Trials And Its Impact On American Society1881 Words   |  8 PagesDid you know that the Salem witch trials resulted in the execution of only twenty people? Most people believe that hundreds of people were executed during the Salem witch tria ls, which is often a very common thought but in actuality only twenty people (mostly women) were executed. The Salem witch trials was a huge part of American history, they are important to remember because they are probably a crucial turning point for America, because before the trials religion and superstition were very importantRead MoreIs Witch Trails A Thing Of The Past?923 Words   |  4 Pages Being that the Salem Witch Trails date back to over three hundred years, many people believe witch trails are a thing of the past. However, modern day witch trails are still extremely prevalent. Modern-day witch-hunts are reported to still be happening in Africa, the Pacific, Latin America, even in the U.S. and Europe. According to a New York Times article, within the last fifteen years alone, more than 2,000 Indians have been killed after being accused of witchcraft. Almost all of the accused haveRead MoreSalem Witch Trials : A Public Choice Perspective843 Words   |  4 PagesThe Sal em witch trials are a memorable period in time that had a huge impact on American society. Many people are still questioning this historical event and what lead to the people of Salem developing that particular mentality. Benjamin Ray’s, â€Å"Salem witch trials† grants primary source historical documents to support the allegations of the witch trials in that period. On the other hand, Franklin and Len’s â€Å"The allocation of death in the Salem witch trials: A public choice perspective† focuses primarilyRead MoreThe Trials Of The Salem Witch Trials1635 Words   |  7 Pagesovercome was the Salem Witch Trials. The Salem Witch Trials occurred in 1692 and 1693 in colonial Massachusetts. â€Å"More than 200 people were accused of practicing witchcraft – the Devil’s magic – and 20 were executed† as detailed by Jess Blumberg on the web article A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials (Blumberg 2007). The trials had a major impact on the American society and the effects could be seen in colonial America as well as today. Why did the injustice of the Salam Witch Trials occur and whyRead MoreSalem Witch Trials1478 Words   |  6 PagesThe Salem Witch Trials of 1692 were a series of trials in which twenty-four people were killed after being accused of practicing witchcraft. These trials were caused by different social climates of the area including the very strong lack of a governor, the split between Salem Village and Salem Town, and the strict puritan lifestyle during the time period. Tituba, the black slave, was a foreigner from Barbados. Her role in society was to take care of Mr. Parris’s family. Tituba’s situation contributedRead MoreThe Salem Witch Trials and McCarthyism666 Words   |  3 Pagesthe Salem witch trials and red scare, are often overlooked. These events symbolize times of despair, weakness, and slander, to which the essence of the events is nearly identical. The Salem witch trials can be closely compared to McCarthyism and the red scare, based on the similarities of suspicion, accusation, and prosecution. Despite the difference of roughly two hundred and sixty years, the outcome of such uprisings has remained unchanged. The morals discovered during the Salem witch trials failedRead MoreThe Salem Witch Trials Essay1349 Words   |  6 PagesBefore 1692, the supernatural was a part of people’s everyday normal life. This is so as people strongly believed that Satan was present and active on earth. Men and women in Salem Village believed that all the misfortunes that befell them were the work of the devil. For example, when things like infant death, crop failures or friction among the congregation occurred, people were quick to blame the supernatural. This concept first emerged in Europe around the fifteenth century and then spread toRead MoreEssay on Did Religion Impact American History?561 Words   |  3 Pagescountries across the world. Many historians believe America was formed on the basis of religion. In this research paper, I will illustrate the impact religion had on American History to 1877. Specifically, it will examine: 1) Major events impacting traditional religious beliefs in America, 2) Religious disputes which impacted land development, and 3) The impact religion had on slavery. Religion is closely tied to events like the Protestant Reformation and other religious movements. The ProtestantRead MoreThe Mccarthy Hearings Vs The Salem Witch Trials Essay1011 Words   |  5 PagesHearings vs The Salem Witch Trials The McCarthy Hearings and the Salem Witch Trials both transformed the thought process of Americans today. Despite being described as completely unique and distinguished events, they both are eerily similar in appearance. The Salem Witch Trials and McCarthyism are both described as witch hunts with several similarities in the way the inspired fear but they have several differences in the motivation and the end of each event. The Salem Witch Trials is know for its

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Analysis Of Hurston s The Sea Tempest - 1184 Words

Dialect can be characterized as verbalized variant of the dialect , having perceived attributes. It has a local and frequently class dialect with the particular utilization of lexicon, grammar,and elocution.Dialect not just avails the per user to visually perceive what day and age, district ,culture,etc. the character originate from yet the utilization of dialect supplementally makes the characters in the novel appear to be genuine; they get to be distinctly plausible. Hurston utilizes dialect to bring the story and adscititious the characters to life. In the wake of making some underlying alterations as a per utilize to get comfortable with the dialect, perusers feel as though they were genuinely a component of the activity. It is paramount that the dialect utilized as a component of the novel is more homogeneous to a Southern vernacular, as opposed to an African-American dialect. Not just do Janie, Tea Cake, and their companions have comparative discourse designs, adscititious the gatekeepers who charge Tea Cake after the sea tempest verbalize in an equipollent dialect. Hurston s nature with the dialect of the South empowers her to precisely delineate the dialect of the locale. â€Å"Ah see you is. Gal, you sho looks good.† This quote taken from page four of the book. The reader can optically discern from the way they verbalize that they are more than likely uneducated and have a southern magnetize to their intonation. Subsequently, the di alect establishes how the characters